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Archive for the ‘Media Analysis’ Category

We Are The Champions?

In Media Analysis on May 13, 2013 at 10:00

The prospect of an all-German Champions League final provided material for Germany’s tabloid Bild-Zeitung for some crude reporting. Under the headline ‘We Are The Champions’ the sub-heading reads: but not every one likes it. In fact, level-minded Germans are aware of the fact that Germany’s image throughout this current crisis in Europe has suffered severely, yet the article is a reminder of some dark thoughts from the not so distant past. Read the rest of this entry »

How not to write about football

In Media Analysis on April 17, 2013 at 13:35

Football is a fantastic game to play and to watch. It is also some task to write about football. However, Germany’s leading newspaper, the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung has given an example how not to do it. Read the rest of this entry »

quo vadis journalism?

In Media Analysis on March 15, 2013 at 12:17

Is it a bad time to be a journalist? Not to mention becoming one? What are the chances in journalism today? Are there any? Read the rest of this entry »

2012 in review

In Media Analysis on January 4, 2013 at 20:42

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

600 people reached the top of Mt. Everest in 2012. This blog got about 9,700 views in 2012. If every person who reached the top of Mt. Everest viewed this blog, it would have taken 16 years to get that many views.

Click here to see the complete report.

Google vs. Germany?

In Media Analysis on December 10, 2012 at 11:00

Germany has been in the media in recent weeks for all the wrong reasons. While its standing has suffered in the handling of the continuing crises in Europe, the most heated debate over the last few weeks has been the Leistungsschutzrecht, the ancillary copyright law. Read the rest of this entry »

The Curse of Wembley

In Anglo-German Relations, England, Football, Germany, History, Media Analysis on September 5, 2012 at 10:40
Geoff Hurst's controversial second goal during...

Geoff Hurst’s controversial second goal during the 1966 FIFA World Cup Final is still not known to have crossed the goal line or not. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The title of the film by German film maker Stefan Keber suggests what many people already know: England have not won any major trophy since their World Cup triumph at Wembley in July 1966: England are cursed by Wembley and the third goal. Not just that, every time they appeared to be coming close to another final, there were German teams eliminating them from the tournament. The last time in 1996 at the Euro held in England. Read the rest of this entry »

Olympic Legacy

In Britain, Identity, Media Analysis, Olympics on August 14, 2012 at 15:21

The London Games of 2012 are history and they have made history as London was the first city to host Olympic Games (summer or winter) three times. The LOCOG have argued that the games would all be about the legacy and it certainly was this fact that made gave London the games ahead of Paris when the decision was made in July 2005. Was this idea of a legacy just a smoke screen? Read the rest of this entry »

The Ugly Germans

In Germany, History, Media Analysis, Stereotypes on August 8, 2012 at 16:00

A week end’s edition of Germany‘s Handelsblatt, a paper entirely about economics, provided some interesting reading. Over 8 pages writers and columnists reported from France, Greece, Spain, Ireland, Britain and what the people think of Germany during the current Euro crisis. A content analysis. Read the rest of this entry »

Merkel’s Double Standards

In Football, History, Media Analysis, Politics on June 22, 2012 at 15:13

I’ve already written something about the Greece – Germany quarterfinal tonight (http://wp.me/pY9NP-i8), but here is another excellent post about the same subject. More vocal, more critical, very good! Read it!

Dear Kitty. Some blog

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This video is called EURO 2012 Greece-Russia: Greek and Russian football fans in Warsaw.

The Euro 2012 European football championship in Poland and Ukraine has reached the quarter-final stage.

From now on, it is the “knock out system”: if a team loses one match, it is out. The winners proceed to the next round.

Tomorrow, Friday evening east European time, in Gdansk in Poland, Germany will play Greece.

Angela Merkel, chancellor of Germany, will be there.

Earlier, there had been news that Ms Merkel’s government would boycott the football championship. As a protest against violations of the rights of Ukrainian ex-prime minister Yulia Volodymyrivna Tymoshenko; now in jail for corruption.

Not that human rights were any better when Ms Tymoshenko and her “orange” coalition still ruled the Ukraine. Ms Merkel cares about Tymoshenko, not because she cares about human rights in general. But because Tymoshenko, a…

View original post 315 more words

When Politics play Football: Greece vs. Germany Euro 2012

In Football, Germany, Media Analysis, Politics, Sport on June 22, 2012 at 15:10

The quarter-final between Greece and Germany, like no other carries an extra political burden with it. On the one hand Greece a country which is bothering the Euro zone quite some bit to say the least. On the other Germany, the strongest economy of the continent will play out who will progress to the semi-final at Euro 2012. Read the rest of this entry »

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